Which type of door?

Opening styles – doors

Entrance doors

PERFORMANCE timber Entrance door_FULL featured image

Tend to be single doors, usually inward opening. New building regulations will probably require a mobility sill and to be of a minimum width (to accommodate wheelchairs etc).

Because of privacy and visibility issues, entrance doors are rarely fully glazed and often are half-boarded or with a small fixed window at the top. For buildings with porches, there might also need to be fixed glazed side lights etc.

Stable doors

Can be for either front or back doors.

Advantages

  • Offers ventilation
  • Sociable
  • Security – offers a physical barrier while allowing occupants to speak to visitors

Disadvantages

  • More expensive than regular entrance doors
  • Less airtight than regular entrance doors

Back doors

Tend to be single doors opening inwards into (typically) a kitchen or utility room Back doors may not need a mobility threshold and tend to be either fully glazed or half glazed as privacy issues tend to be less important (ie the back door is less likely to be overlooked)

Suitable ranges:

Inward opening

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Outward opening

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French doors (double)

PERFORMANCE French Doors at Arts and Crafts style house

Double doors that usually open outwards onto a garden or patio. Usually fully glazed to get the benefit of light into house and view outside.

Advantages

  • Can be locked from outside and has handles on outside of door
  • Can be inward or outward opening

Disadvantages

  • Total maximum opening width about 2.5m (1.25m for each leaf of the door).

Suitable ranges:

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Fold-aside (bi-fold) doors

Triple Glazed timber bifold door at Four walls retrofit

Usually open onto a garden or patio from a room – ideal for those wanting to create the effect of the having the ‘outside inside’! Can go in a wider gap/  opening than a French door .

Advantages

  • Good for larger openings in the wall
  • Facade can open the whole span of the opening

Disadvantages

  • Maximum individual door leaf size up to around 900 mm so has a  greater timber to  glass ratio (ie there is not a large unbroken expanse of glass). Example max sizes: 3 leaf 2600 mm + 900 mm for any additional leafs.
  • Less airtight than other options.

Suitable ranges:

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Tilt & slide

tilt & slide door

Usually open onto a garden/ patio. One pane of the door is fixed and the other slides behind it. Can go in a wider gap/  opening than  a French door .

Advantages

  • Larger (uninterrupted) panes of glass
  • Can cope with an individual door leaf size of up to 2m wide
  • Can tilt inwards for ventilation
  • Good levels of airtightness

Disadvantages

  • Can be difficult to operate – particularly with a large door leaf
  • Only supplied with an internal handle

Suitable ranges:

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Lift & slide

Green Building Store PERFORMANCE triple glazed timber Lift and Slide doorUsually open onto a garden/ patio. Options for one pane or both panes sliding. Can go in a wider gap/  opening than  a French door .

Advantages

  • Larger (uninterrupted) panes of glass
  • Can cope with an individual door leaf size of up to 2.5m
  • Very simple and easy to operate

Disadvantages

  • Reduced levels of airtightness
  • Only supplied with an internal handle

Suitable ranges:

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Balcony tilt & turn door

Essentially this is a very large window that can be used as an inward-opening  door in certain situations (eg for a ‘juliet balcony’). Available as a single or double door.

Advantages

  • Good levels of airtightness
  • Less expensive than a door

Disadvantages

  • Only open inwards

Suitable ranges:

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